The Literacy Nest

The Top Ten Websites for Dyslexia Awareness

Thursday, August 9, 2018


websites about dyslexia

Whether you are just beginning your journey to understand dyslexia or looking to find helpful reference tools to spread dyslexia awareness, you need a go-to list.

I've spoken with a lot of classroom teachers over the years who really WANT to learn about dyslexia, because guess why? Their professors never brought up dyslexia in any of their teacher training courses. And that is not their fault. It is a systemic problem with colleges and universities that needs serious change. 

Searching online for well respected and informative sites about dyslexia can sometimes be a bit challenging. I've taken the searching and guesswork away for you in a website roundup.

Getting The Facts About Dyslexia

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Facts about dyslexia


As an Orton-Gillingham tutor, I find the need to spread dyslexia awareness is ever present. Dyslexia is one of the most common and least understood issues that face learners. There are many myths that surround dyslexia and how best to treat or remediate it. In fact, there are still people who insist that there is no such thing as dyslexia. We are lucky that today we live in a time when brain research has learned more than ever before about how the human brain works and how individuals with dyslexia learn differently. 

How To Explain Orton-Gillingham to Families

Thursday, July 19, 2018

explaining orton-gillingham approach to families


Explaining Orton-Gillingham to Families

It can be a challenge when talking about dyslexia and the parts of an Orton-Gillingham lesson to avoid using a lot of technical language and jargon. Many times, parents seeking tutoring services have been told their child should receive Orton-Gillingham instruction or sometimes a specific O-G based program, without really getting much guidance on what that means. 

Multisensory Teaching Techniques in the Classroom

Thursday, July 5, 2018

multisensory teaching techniques


Using Multisensory Teaching Techniques

Multisensory learning strategies are crucial not just for kids with dyslexia, or within Orton-Gillingham lesson plans, it is good solid teaching for ALL students. Incorporating multisensory learning tools into your classroom lessons will not replace intervention services, but it will make classroom lessons more accessible to students with learning differences. 


As you know, multisensory teaching techniques are valuable not only for students who struggle with reading and writing skills, but for all students. Using a variety of senses helps with memory and retrieval and allows a student to support their areas of weakness with their areas of strength. Summer is a great time to refresh your teaching, learn new skills and plan a different way of doing things for the next school year. Hopefully, that way will be multisensory.

Here are even more ways to incorporate multisensory learning strategies into your school day. 


If you missed PART ONE of this blog series, be sure to read, "Multisensory Teaching Strategies in the Classroom."


Multisensory Teaching Strategies in the Classroom: Part One

Thursday, June 21, 2018

multisensory learning tools



Multisensory Teaching Strategies in the Classroom

Part One: Using Multisensory Teaching Techniques

Multisensory teaching is not just crucial for kids with dyslexia, or within Orton-Gillingham lesson plans, it is good solid teaching for ALL students. Incorporating multisensory learning tools into your classroom lessons will not replace intervention services, but it will make classroom lessons more accessible to students with learning differences. 

Dyslexia is more than likely under identified, particularly in gifted students that may be performing at the average of their class or student with a mild disability and strengths that offset their challenges to some degree. For those kids that are likely to fall through the cracks, the anxiety and stress associated with school tasks is painful. Incorporating good multisensory teaching techiques in your classroom is a breath of fresh air for those children.

Multisensory teaching means that when information is presented, the learner is simultaneously using multiple senses. Visual, auditory and kinesthetic (or tactile) are the 3 primary senses that students use and these correspond to the visual, auditory and motor (or muscle) memory. The more pathways and connections a student uses for learning a new item of knowledge, the more pathways they have for retrieval of this information. Because so often children are asked to perform in school using what may be for them their weakest areas, linking these all together can act as a bridge between a child’s strengths and weaknesses. 
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